More News Surrounding Terri's life and death

 

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Nearly 1,000 turn out for Schiavo's funeral; priest denounces death
 


The Orlando Sentinel
 

(KRT) - Terri Schiavo was remembered Tuesday evening at a Roman Catholic funeral Mass in which nearly 1,000 people cheered an activist priest's call to action on behalf of the brain-damaged woman who died Thursday after a bitter 15-year battle over her fate.

"God calls us to go forth from this place and build a culture of life," said the Rev. Frank Pavone, leader of Priests for Life, as he announced in his homily "the next chapter" in the Schiavo story to a cheering crowd that included Schiavo's parents and siblings.

In his sermon, Pavone also drew a standing ovation and cheers when he called upon those present to take action "so that what happened in this tragic place will never happen again."

Terri Schiavo's brother, Bobby, fought tears near the end of the two-hour service as he spoke, comparing her death to those of Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist victims. He held up a Purple Heart medal - which some Sept. 11 victims received - saying that his sister also deserved the medal because she, too, was a "victim of national terrorism."

Pavone, who said that Schiavo suffered greatly in her death, said that the death resulted from "a clash of world views" between "those who say suffering is meaningless" and Christians "who do not watch human suffering from a distance but instead jump into it."

He followed that and drew an even more enthusiastic response by attacking the legal system that upheld Michael Schiavo's efforts to stop the feeding of his wife.

"The Holy Father makes it so clear that any human demand or decree that violates human rights is no law at all."

The priest, who charged on the day of Terri Schiavo's death that she had been murdered by her husband when she was deprived of food and water, did not openly attack Michael Schiavo at the mostly reverent memorial.

But family friends and others who registered at a reception table beforehand were offered bright red bumper stickers with white lettering that said: "Terri Was Murdered."

Several people carried the bumper stickers into Most Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church for the nearly two-hour service in the home parish of Terri Schiavo's parents, Bob and Mary Schindler.

The couple, who sat with their son and daughter, Suzanne Vitadamo, in front pews looking into an altar surrounded by white lilies, have continued their battles with Michael Schiavo. They've charged that their estranged son-in-law, who was not present at Tuesday's service, has yet to reveal to them his plans for services and burial of their daughter's cremated remains - in spite of a court order to do so.

Photographs of Terri Schiavo - before and after she suffered brain damage from a 1990 heart attack thought to be triggered by a potassium deficiency - were displayed in the front of the church, at the reception hall, and on prayer cards that also offered one of her favorite quotes: "Where there is life, there is hope."

The back of the prayer card showed a photograph of the brain-damaged woman superimposed onto an image of Jesus Christ.

Family, friends and many of those who had demonstrated and protested outside Woodside Hospice in recent weeks filled the small, unadorned church and spilled out into the front hall and exterior. The service was broadcast on loudspeakers so that those outside, including a large contingent of television and print photographers - who were not allowed inside the church - could hear.

The Mass was conducted by the Rev. Thaddeus Malanowski, who gave Schiavo last rites before she died on Thursday and who also conducted daily Masses outside the hospice for more than a week before her death.

Seven other priests and three deacons participated in the service, which featured a young choir group backed by guitars and violins.

"She showed us how to live. She showed us the gift of life and how we should share it," Malanowski told the congregation.

Later, Franciscan friar Paul O'Donnell, who served as the Schindlers' spiritual adviser and spokesman, decried "the culture of death" that surrounded the family controversy.

Terri Schiavo died 13 days after courts allowed her husband to order her feeding tube removed in a controversial decision that reached the U.S. Supreme Court, the White House, Congress, and even ailing Pope John Paul II at the Vatican.

The parents, who opposed the cremation, had wished to bury her in Florida. The husband has said that her ashes will be interred in his family's plot in Pennsylvania, where Terri Schiavo grew up and met him.

There were several references to the late pope and his efforts to intervene in the Schiavo case. Pavone suggested in his sermon that the pope followed Schiavo in death by 48 hours as an act of "solidarity."

A gold bust of the recently deceased pontiff was placed on a table in the church. There were also frequent references to the fact that Schiavo died during Holy Week, which celebrates the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ in her Roman Catholic faith.

Pavone drew the first standing ovation when he began his impassioned homily by offering "four simple words" to Terri Schiavo's spirit on behalf of her family, millions around the world, and the late pope:

"We are with you," the priest said solemnly as those in the church applauded and rose to their feet.

---

2005, The Orlando Sentinel (Fla.).

Visit the Sentinel on the World Wide Web at http://www.orlandosentinel.com. On America Online, use keyword: OSO.Source: .http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/nation/11319632.htm?template=contentModules/printstory.jsp

 

Hundreds of Mourners Gather to Remember Terri Schiavo at Funeral Mass Arranged by Her Parents

By MITCH STACY

The Associated Press

Apr. 6, 2005 - Hundreds of mourners gathered Tuesday to remember Terri Schiavo at a funeral Mass arranged by her parents, while her husband held on to her cremated remains and planned a separate service.

The woman's parents, Bob and Mary Schindler, sat in the front row of Most Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church, joined by their two other grown children. Outside, mourners sat in folding chairs or stood as the service was relayed on loudspeakers. At least 800 people attended.

"She showed us how to live. She showed us the gift of life and how we should share it," the Rev. Thaddeus Malanowski said. He gave Schiavo last rites before she died Thursday.

Suzanne Vitadamo, Terri Schiavo's sister, said Schiavo had "shown the world what perseverance and determination are all about."

A table beside the altar held a photo of Schiavo taken in the 1980s before she suffered severe brain damage, one of the pictures widely shown in the last days of the protracted right-to-die case. A photo and gold bust of Pope John Paul II were also on the table.

"God calls us to go forth from this place to work together, to preach and witness together so what happened in this tragic case will never happen again," the Rev. Frank Pavone said in his sermon. He is the national director of the anti-abortion group Priests For Life.

Bishop Robert Lynch of the Diocese of St. Petersburg declined to take a stand against removing Terri Schiavo's feeding tube but offered words of comfort.

"At this time, now that Terri has gone to meet our Lord, I continue to hope and pray that all of Terri's family members may seek and find healing and peace from God," Lynch said in a statement.

Schiavo's parents had opposed her cremation and hoped to bury her in their adopted state of Florida.

But her husband, Michael Schiavo, ordered her cremation and said her ashes would be buried in his family's plot in Pennsylvania, the state where Terri Schiavo grew up and where the couple met.

Michael Schiavo has not said when his memorial service will be held, but he is under a court order to notify the parents of his plans. Schiavo's attorney, George Felos, did not return a call Tuesday seeking comment.

The 41-year-old brain-damaged woman died Thursday after a long, bitter legal battle between her husband and parents.

Court-appointed doctors said she was in a persistent vegetative state, and Michael Schiavo said his wife would not want to be kept alive artificially. Her parents doubted she had such end-of-life wishes and disputed she was in a persistent vegetative state.

The dramatic case reached all the way to Congress, the U.S. Supreme Court, the Vatican and White House in recent weeks as the Schindlers tried to block the court order that allowed Michael Schiavo to remove the feeding tube.

The Schindlers had asked a judge to allow her body to remain intact and have her buried in Florida so they can visit the grave. But a judge refused to intervene.

Terri Schiavo was 26 when her heart stopped beating temporarily in 1990, causing monumental brain damage. Doctors later attributed it to a chemical imbalance possibly brought on by an eating disorder.

 

http://abcnews.go.com/US/print?id=644721

 

By HEDDY MURPHEY
Published March 24, 2005
 

To date, The St. Petersburg Times has published about 500 articles about Terri Schiavo. The first one appeared almost 15 years ago, on Nov. 15, 1990.

At the time, the city of St. Pete Beach was still called St. Petersburg Beach and Michael Schiavo and Terri's parents were still speaking to one another. Here is the story, exactly as it was published.

- MIKE WILSON, assistant managing editor/Newsfeatures

* * *

ST. PETERSBURG BEACH - Mike Schiavo vividly remembers the morning of Feb. 25. Usually a late sleeper, Schiavo awakened suddenly about 5 a.m. and started to get out of bed.

"For some strange reason that day, I was just taking the covers off, and then she hit the floor," he said.

Schiavo's 26-year-old wife, Terri, had suddenly - and as yet inexplicably - suffered a loss of potassium in her body that caused her heart to stop beating. She was rushed to the hospital.

She has been in a coma ever since.

Efforts to bring Mrs. Schiavo out of her coma have become a community crusade.

The city of St. Petersburg Beach passed a resolution Tuesday declaring Feb. 17, 1991, as Terri Schiavo Day. On that day, volunteers plan to conduct a huge beach party to raise money to help pay for an experimental operation that, according to Dr. David Baras, medical director of Bayfront Rehabilitation Center, is Mrs. Schiavo's "last hope."

"The prognosis is poor. Fair at best" without any further treatment, Baras said. "This (surgery) is brand new. It's experimental. It's sort of like our last chance."

Members of the Vina Del Mar Civic Association also have asked city officials if they can name one of the new dune walkovers in Mrs. Schiavo's honor. They hope to raise money by having people buy individual planks on the walkover to be engraved with either their own name or the name of someone they wish to honor.

The operation will be performed by Dr. Yoshio Hosobuchi of the University of California at San Francisco later this month. According to Mrs. Schiavo's family, expenses for the trip to California, operation and subsequent rehabilitation will cost at least $100,000.

Mary Schindler, Mrs. Schiavo's mother, said the family is being permitted to make an initial down payment for the procedure and pay the balance as they can.

Mrs. Schiavo is being cared for at College Harbor nursing facility. Schiavo and Mrs. Schindler said they tried to care for her at home, but because Mrs. Schiavo has a tube in her stomach and is catheterized, they found the task too much for them to handle. They visit her daily.

The fight to bring Terri out of her coma also is being fought in the legal arena. Schiavo recently filed his second lawsuit against the Prudential Insurance Co. of America. Mrs. Schiavo worked for Prudential and was insured by the company. Schiavo's first lawsuit over benefits was settled in July.

Among other things, the latest suit, filed Monday, contends that Mrs. Schiavo is entitled to long-term nursing care.

"Prudential has taken the position that family should take care of those needs after a week of training. We don't think that meets terms of the contract," said Roland Lamb, Schiavo's attorney.

Mrs. Schiavo's family is paying about $3,000 a month for her care at College Harbor, Schiavo said.

Jeff Kovalesky, director of group operations with Prudential, said Wednesday he was not aware of the latest suit and declined to comment further. He said the terms of the earlier settlement prevent both parties from discussing Mrs. Schiavo's condition or benefits publicly.

Lamb said Prudential will not help pay the cost of Mrs. Schiavo's upcoming surgery because it is experimental.

Dr. Raj Narayan, associate professor of neurosurgery at Baylor College of Medicine, said he is familiar with Hosobuchi's work and confirmed the experimental nature of the proposed surgery.

"There has been very little done with it in the U.S. Most of the experience has been in Japan and Europe," he said. The procedure has been performed on 120 patients worldwide, he said. Thirty percent showed some improvement, he said, adding that the operation is considered risky.

Narayan, chairman of the joint section on neurotrauma for the American Association of Neurological Surgery, said Hosobuchi is "a well-known and well-respected figure in the field."

Editor's note: A later article reported that Schiavo had surgery to implant a "brain stimulator."

That story reported: "Mrs. Schiavo is slowly emerging from the coma at the Mediplex Medical Center, a neurological care center in Bradenton, (Michael Schiavo) said. She will undergo at least a year of speech, occupational and physical therapy."

- Word for Word is an occasional feature excerpting passages of interest from books, magazines, Web sites and other sources. The text may be edited for space but the original spelling, grammar and punctuation are unchanged.

[Last modified March 23, 2005, 14:15:38]


Source: http://www.sptimes.com/ 2005/03/24/Floridian/15_years_ago__Terri_S.shtml


   

To: National Desk, Legal Reporter

Contact: Jerry Horn of Priests for Life, 540-785-4733; Web: http://www.priestsforlife.org

NEW YORK, April 5 /U.S. Newswire/ -- In response to the criticism some have voiced to his statements that Terri Schiavo's death was a murder, Fr. Frank Pavone, national director of Priests for Life, issued the following statement this morning:

"Yes, Murder.

"Terri Schiavo was in fact murdered by being deprived of food and water for 13 days. The reason Michael Schiavo's attorney George Felos was so upset that I said this is because he is a euthanasia advocate, and the only way to advance euthanasia is to sugar-coat it, and never call it murder. But it is. Moreover, it is inaccurate to describe Terri Schiavo's death as peaceful and gentle. I was with her for several hours the night before she died and again the next morning up until ten minutes before she died. She was in an agony unlike anything I have ever seen, and to describe it in any other way is irresponsible and dishonest.

"As for Mr. Felos' plea that I speak words of compassion and reconciliation, I have indeed done so publicly over recent months. But compassion does not mean compromising the truth, and reconciliation is possible only when one repents of doing evil acts like killing. The role of a priest, moreover, is not simply to make people feel good, but to denounce injustice and proclaim truth, no matter how discomforting it may be."

http://www.usnewswire.com 

Source http://releases.usnewswire.com/GetRelease.asp?id=45339

 

by Steven Ertelt
LifeNews.com Editor
April 1, 2005


Washington, DC (LifeNews.com) -- Polls leading up to the death of Terri Schiavo made it appear Americans had formed a consensus in favor of ending her life. However, a new Zogby poll with fairer questions shows the nation clearly supporting Terri and her parents and wanting to protect the lives of other disabled patients.

The Zogby poll found that, if a person becomes incapacitated and has not expressed their preference for medical treatment, as in Terri's case, 43 percent say "the law presume that the person wants to live, even if the person is receiving food and water through a tube" while just 30 percent disagree.

Another Zogby question his directly on Terri's circumstances.

"If a disabled person is not terminally ill, not in a coma, and not being kept alive on life support, and they have no written directive, should or should they not be denied food and water," the poll asked.

A whopping 79 percent said the patient should not have food and water taken away while just 9 percent said yes.

"From the very start of this debate, Americans have sat on one of two sides," Concerned Women for America's Lanier Swann said in response to the poll. One side "believes Terri's life has worth and purpose, and the side who saw Michael Schiavo's actions as merciful, and appropriate."

More than three-fourths of Americans agreed, Swann said, "because a person is disabled, that patient should never be denied food and water."

The poll also lent support to members of Congress to who passed legislation seeking to prevent Terri's starvation death and help her parents take their lawsuit to federal courts.

"When there is conflicting evidence on whether or not a patient would want to be on a feeding tube, should elected officials order that a feeding tube be removed or should they order that it remain in place," respondents were asked.

Some 18 percent said the feeding tube should be removed and 42 percent said it should remain in place.

Swann said her group would encourage Congress to adopt legislation that would federal courts to review cases when the medical treatment desire of individuals is not known and the patient's family has a dispute over the care.

"According to these poll results, many Americans do in fact agree with what we're trying to accomplish," she said.

The poll found that 49 percent of Americans believe there should be exceptions to the right of a spouse to act as a guardian for an incapacitated spouse. Only 39 percent disagreed.

When asked directly about Terri's case and told the her estranged husband Michael "has had a girlfriend for 10 years and has two children with her" 56 percent of Americans believed guardianship should have been turned over to Terri's parents while 37 percent disagreed.
 

Terri Schiavo's parents - http://www.terrisfight.org


Printed from: http://www.lifenews.com/bio891.html

 

by Steven Ertelt
LifeNews.com Editor
April 1, 2005


Washington, DC (LifeNews.com) -- Polls leading up to the death of Terri Schiavo made it appear Americans had formed a consensus in favor of ending her life. However, a new Zogby poll with fairer questions shows the nation clearly supporting Terri and her parents and wanting to protect the lives of other disabled patients.

The Zogby poll found that, if a person becomes incapacitated and has not expressed their preference for medical treatment, as in Terri's case, 43 percent say "the law presume that the person wants to live, even if the person is receiving food and water through a tube" while just 30 percent disagree.

Another Zogby question his directly on Terri's circumstances.

"If a disabled person is not terminally ill, not in a coma, and not being kept alive on life support, and they have no written directive, should or should they not be denied food and water," the poll asked.

A whopping 79 percent said the patient should not have food and water taken away while just 9 percent said yes.

"From the very start of this debate, Americans have sat on one of two sides," Concerned Women for America's Lanier Swann said in response to the poll. One side "believes Terri's life has worth and purpose, and the side who saw Michael Schiavo's actions as merciful, and appropriate."

More than three-fourths of Americans agreed, Swann said, "because a person is disabled, that patient should never be denied food and water."

The poll also lent support to members of Congress to who passed legislation seeking to prevent Terri's starvation death and help her parents take their lawsuit to federal courts.

"When there is conflicting evidence on whether or not a patient would want to be on a feeding tube, should elected officials order that a feeding tube be removed or should they order that it remain in place," respondents were asked.

Some 18 percent said the feeding tube should be removed and 42 percent said it should remain in place.

Swann said her group would encourage Congress to adopt legislation that would federal courts to review cases when the medical treatment desire of individuals is not known and the patient's family has a dispute over the care.

"According to these poll results, many Americans do in fact agree with what we're trying to accomplish," she said.

The poll found that 49 percent of Americans believe there should be exceptions to the right of a spouse to act as a guardian for an incapacitated spouse. Only 39 percent disagreed.

When asked directly about Terri's case and told the her estranged husband Michael "has had a girlfriend for 10 years and has two children with her" 56 percent of Americans believed guardianship should have been turned over to Terri's parents while 37 percent disagreed.
 

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