*pain and undertreatment of pain

On this page are exerpts from:

bulletUndertreatment of chronic non cancer pain ~ Pain is often managed inadequately, despite the ready availability of safe and effective treatments

 

bullet "Pain and Suffering in History–Narratives of Science, Medicine and Culture." 

 

The Use of Opioids for the Treatment of Chronic Pain:

bulletUndertreatment of chronic non cancer pain ~ Pain is often managed inadequately, despite the ready availability of safe and effective treatments

The following are all quotes taken from The Use of Opioids for the Treatment of Chronic Pain

The undertreatment of pain in today's society is not justified.

There is currently no nationally accepted consensus for the treatment of chronic pain not due to cancer, yet the economic and social costs of chronic pain are substantial, with estimates ranging in the tens of billions of dollars annually.   Pain is often managed inadequately, despite the ready availability of safe and effective treatments ~ Pain is one of the most common reasons people consult a physician, yet it frequently is inadequately treated, leading to enormous social cost in the form of lost productivity, needless suffering, and excessive healthcare expenditures. Impediments to the use of opioids include concerns about addiction, respiratory depression and ther side effects, tolerance, diversion, and fear of regulatory action.   

                                                                                                                                               Fear of inducing respiratory depression is often cited as a factor that limits the use of opioids in pain management. 

It is now accepted by practitioners of the specialty of pain medicine that respiratory depression induced by opioids tends to be a short-lived phenomenon, generally occurs only in the opioid-naive patient, and is antagonized by pain.

 Therefore, withholding the appropriate use of opioids from a patient who is experiencing pain on the basis of respiratory concerns is unwarranted. 

Other side effects, such as constipation, can usually be managed by attention to diet, along with the regular use of stool softeners and laxatives. 

Sedation and nausea, possible early side effects, usually dissipate with continued use.

 

Current information and experience suggest that many commonly held assumptions need modification.  Studies indicate that the de novo development of addiction when opioids are used for the relief of pain is low.


Diversion of controlled substances should be a concern of every health professional, but efforts to stop diversion should not interfere with prescribing opioids for pain management.  

The mission of the American Pain Society is to serve people in pain by advancing research, education, treatment, and professional practice. The undertreatment of pain in today's society is not justified. This joint consensus statement has been produced pursuant to the missions of both organizations, to help foster a practice environment in which opioids may be used appropriately to reduce needless suffering from pain.

The above are excerpts only.  For complete text visit the source at http://www.ampainsoc.org/advocacy/opioids.htm#top

 

 

 

bullet"Pain and Suffering in History–Narratives of Science, Medicine and Culture." 

In 1998 an exhibit was prepared in conjunction with the Symposium:  "Pain and Suffering in History–Narratives of Science, Medicine and Culture."   The symposium and the exhibit marked the official dedication of the John C. Liebeskind History of Pain Collection at the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library, UCLA. 

CHN encourages the reader to visit this site - it offers an excellent historical overview of pain ~ it gives a brief background of the doctors and scientists who worked to relieve what Albert Schweitzer called "the most terrible of all the lords of mankind." This site is a good place to start in the study of pain.  It also lists additional links.

Here follows the index ~ click to link; To return to CHN you will need to use your back button, or bookmark our site.  Thank you.

|   Pain Alleviation and "Anesthesia"
19th Century and Earlier


|   The Anesthesia Revolution of the
1800s Early Experiments with Surgical Anesthesia


|   Pioneer Neurophysiology: Mapping
the Pain Pathways and Reading the Sensations


|   Phantom Limb and Causalgia:
The Tragic Enigmas


|   Pain on the Scales: The Problem of Measurement
|   The Gate Control Model Opens
a New Era in Pain Research


|   John Bonica, Pain's Champion,
and the Multidisciplinary Pain Clinic


|   A Fertile Period in Pain Research:
The Example of the Liebeskind
Lab at UCLA

Be sure not to miss "Pain can kill"

|   Pain and the Dying: the Hospice
Movement and the Work of
Cicely Saunders


|   Professional Organizations
and their Founding
 

The above are excerpts only.  For complete text visit the source at  http://www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/biomed/his/painexhibit/index.html

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